• Produced by the Attorney General’s Cyber-Digital Task Force, the Framework is divided into three parts with a conclusion. It provides an overview of threats and enforcement challenges associated with the increasing use of cryptocurrency; enumerates the criminal and civil statutes and regulatory framework used to investigate and regulate illegal crypto-related activities; and outlines ongoing challenges for businesses involved with cryptocurrency, and future strategies for investigating and prosecuting crypto involved crimes.

  • The author examines the decisions in SEC v. Telegram and how they may impact digital token issuers’ use of the Simple Agreement for Future Tokens model for distributing tokens.

    The Southern District of New York has issued two main rulings in SEC v. Telegram—that the offer and sale of Telegram’s cryptocurrency (Grams) involved a "scheme" to distribute securities subject to 1933 Act registration requirements, and that the Court’s preliminary injunction regarding sales or resales of Grams applies to both U.S. and non-U.S. purchasers. Murphy & McGonigle’s Larry Bergmann examines both rulings and weighs the impact they might have on future issuances of digital tokens. Among other things, Bergmann believes that the decisions will make it more difficult for digital token issuers to argue that securities sold to raise capital can be transformed at a later date into "utility" digital assets that are not securities. He also raises the question of whether improvements can be made to an operational cryptocurrency platform to enhance the value of that platform’s tokens.

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  • Daniel S. Alter attorney profile image

    The agency is seeking public comment on two proposals that will promote the responsible and efficient diversification of cryptocurrencies traded on New York licensed exchanges.

  • The staff of the Division of Corporation Finance issued the second no-action letter permitting an unregistered token offering and sale for use on a functional platform.

  • Daniel M. Payne attorney profile image

    An examination of the first SEC-qualified offering of digital securities issued pursuant to Regulation A (Tier 2) under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”).  

     
  • Murphy & McGonigle, the financial services and regulatory law firm, today released its Blockchain Litigation: 2018 Year in Review Report. Based on proprietary data the firm has collected from its Blockchain Litigation Database, the Report identifies six trends that have clearly emerged as blockchain and cryptocurrencies move closer to the mainstream.

  • This article discusses the statement of the SEC's Divsions of Corporation Finance, Investment Managementa and Trading and Markets relating regulatory approaches to digital assets.  We discuss in particular the path to compliance for entities that issued securities in a manner that did not comply with the registration requirements of the federal securities laws.